Radiotherapy Reduced Salivary Flow Rate and Might Induced C. albicans Infection

Nadia Surjadi, Rahmi Amtha

Abstract


Radiotherapy has impact in oral health especially on the secretion capacity of the salivary glands. Another impact is the increase of Candida albicans colony. Objectives: To evaluate salivary flow in relation with Candida albicans colony in head and neck cancer patients during and after radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-four head and neck cancer patients in Dharmais Cancer Hospital, Jakarta who were undergoing radiotherapy or had undergone radiotherapy and 24 match healthy volunteers were included in the study. Clinical observation carried out by collecting unstimulated salivary flow rate and followed by culture of Candida in Saboraud agar medium. Data were analyzed statistically by Chi-square. Results: Nasopharynx cancer was the most frequent type of head and neck cancers (87.5%) followed by tongue cancer (12.5%) and and found in 41-50 years old patients and 51-60 years old patients respectively, with male predilection compare to female (17:7). Approxiamtely 87.5% of subjects showed decreased salivary flow rate (1.01-1.50mL/10min) during and after radiotherapy. However, 91.7% of cancer patients had increased C.albicans colony during and after radiotherapy compared to control (p=0.00). Conclusion: This study showed that radiotherapy induced hyposalivation and might increase the C.albicans colony.

 


Keywords


Candida albicans; laju aliran saliva; radioterapi

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